A Levels

Visit our next Open Event

A Levels are an exciting chance to explore the subjects you’re passionate about – in real depth.

At Farnborough you’ll study in a friendly department, with its own dedicated area and team of highly qualified lecturers. Students love the welcoming environment here which feels a lot different to school; with smaller class sizes, more chances to ask questions and plenty of time for individual support.

A Levels take two years to complete and are a good choice if you want to develop a high level of academic skill, either in preparation for a university programme or to keep your career options open.

A Levels at Farnborough College of Technology:

  • Small class sizes, with plenty of time to ask questions and receive feedback
  • Up to two hours weekly tutorial for all students to receive support
  • Free personalised revision sessions to boost performance in exams
  • Highly qualified and supportive staff reassure students they are in safe hands
  • Access to bursaries to help overcome the costs of studying
  • Excellent support in preparing for university
  • In-depth help with UCAS applications for university
  • More focused exam periods due to no study leave
  • Warm, welcoming atmosphere to make students feel comfortable
  • Free parking, so students can save their money for clothes, books or food instead!

Contact Us

If you would like to know more about this course then please contact us either by phone on 01252 40 55 55 or email contact enquires@farn-ct.ac.uk.

Apply for this course

Subject Choices

Although there’s plenty of choice when it comes to subjects, you should think about what you’d like to do after college first. For example, universities may want to see that the degree you’ve applied for is a realistic progression from the subjects you’ll have studied. We therefore recommend you talk to us at one of our open events to find out what options could work best for your goals.

Biology

Have you ever wondered what we are made of, how we fight disease or what role plants play in our lives? Then the study of Biology is for you.

Biology is always in the news whether it is finding a potential cure for a disease or how plants can be genetically modified to enhance food production. The AQA course presents Biology as exciting, relevant and challenging.  It emphasizes how science works and the contribution of science to modern society.

Subjects Covered

AS Subject Content:
The “stand-alone” AS qualification has four study units comprised of ‘Biological Molecules’, ‘Cells’, ‘Organisms exchange substances with their environment’, and ‘Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms’. The practical module is integrated with the theoretical topics and assessed through the two written papers.

A Level Subject Content:
Along with the units studied at AS, four more units are studied: ‘Energy transfers in and between organisms’, ‘Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environment’, ‘ Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems’ and ‘The control of gene expression’. There are three exams covering all of AS and A level content, including the integrated practical skills.

What skills will I learn?
The Human Biology A Level course helps students develop a number of skills:
• How to assemble data and assess it
• How to investigate facts and use deduction
• How to put over your point of view fluently
• How to work in a team to achieve this

Resources required
Students will be required to purchase a textbook for both AS and A Level.

On completion

All students will take the AS qualification at the end of the first year comprising two exams covering all four study units and the required practical skills. Those progressing to A level will take three examinations covering all eight units from AS and A level as well as the required practical skills.

Careers

Biology is a great choice of subject for people who want a career in health and clinical professions, where the Government has identified a significant skills shortage, as well as people who want to follow a broad general education.

Students who take Biology often also study from a wide range of subjects including Psychology, Sociology, Chemistry, Physics, Geography and Mathematics.

Business

Business is front page news. The way companies operate is under greater scrutiny than before, while TV programmes like the Apprentice and Dragons Den have raised the profile of Business to a new generation. The new specifications, starting in 2015, bring the subject up to date, enabling students to engage with, explore and understand business behavior and develop a critical understanding of what business is and does.

It is not essential for students to have studied Business at GCSE level but some mathematical ability is needed to calculate profit, breakeven, and cash flow for example. An interest in current affairs is desirable.

Subjects covered

AS Subject content
1. What is business?
2. Managers, leaders and decision making
3. Decision making to improve marketing performance
4. Decision making to improve operational performance
5. Decision making to improve financial performance
6. Decision making to improve human resource performance

Assessment
Paper 1 - Two compulsory questions, including multiple choice, short answer questions and data response questions. 1½ hours. 50% of AS.
Paper 2 – One compulsory case study consisting of seven questions. 1½ hours. 50% of AS.

A Level Subject Content
The six topics from the AS course plus
1. Analysing firms current performance from data
2. Choosing appropriate long term strategies for firms
3. How to implement strategies in the short term
4. How to successfully manage change in the business world

Assessment
Paper 1 - Multiple choice questions, short answer and two essays. 2 hours. 1/3rd of A Level
Paper 2 - Three compulsory data response questions. 2 hours. 1/3rd of A Level
Paper 3 - One compulsory case study consisting of six questions. 2 hours. 1/3rd of A Level

Resources required
AQA A Level Business Year 1and AS ( Fifth Edition ).
Malcolm Surridge and Andrew Gillespie
ISBN: 978-1-471 83613-8

On completion

What Skills will I learn?
• Business terminology such as economies of scale, trademark
• Quantitative skills such as ratios, averages, percentages, fractions
• Being able to analyse the consequences of different business strategies
• Assess and recommend strategies for real firms

Why should I choose this course?
Business is an excellent subject to learn for those who are interested in finding out how firms operate and make profit or those who want to develop the skills needed to set up and run their own firm.

Chemistry

If you enjoyed Chemistry at GCSE, you will love the AS/A Level course. In the two years that will fly by, you will get a real in-depth knowledge of this fascinating subject, preparing you for Higher Education.

Chemists have greatly improved the quality of life for the majority of people. Chemists have, for example, developed drugs for previously untreatable diseases and continue to search to improve our quality of life - without burdening the environment.

The A Level course is underpinned by the practical skills that we call `how science works’. You will find out how chemists are real innovators, designing solutions to the problems that affect modern life.

Subjects Covered

AS Subject Content:
At AS you will study for 3 units:

Unit 1: Physical Chemistry: You will cover foundation subjects like atomic structure, amount of substance, bonding, , kinetics, thermodynamics and equilibria.

Unit 2: Inorganic Chemistry: You will study topics such as redox, group VII and II of the periodic table and periodicity.

Unit 3: Organic Chemistry: You will learn about functional groups- alkanes, alkenes, haloalkanes, and alcohols, and the analytical techniques of mass spectrometry and IR spectroscopy.

A Level Subject Content:
Year two is a continuation from AS level and follows a similar format:

Unit 4: Physical Chemistry: Looks in more depth at kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, thermodynamics, periodicity and electrode potentials.

Unit 5: Inorganic Chemistry: Covers transition metals, reactions of inorganic compounds and period 3 compounds.

Unit 6: Organic Chemistry: Detailed look at carbonyl groups, aromatic chemistry, amines, amino acids and structure determination.

Assessment Pattern:
In year 1 the students are required to sit two exams and in year 2 there are three.

The practical units will be assessed in class and are graded as a pass/fail. There are 12 core practicals, which will have to be completed over the two years.

Resources required
Students will be required to purchase a textbook for both AS and A Level.

Careers

Students with a wide range of interests enjoy the Chemistry course. Chemistry is a great choice of subject for people who want a career in health and clinical professions, such as medicine, nursing, biochemistry, dentistry or forensic sciences.

Chemistry will also equip you for a career in industry, for example in the petrochemical or pharmaceutical industries.

Many students progress into Higher Education.

Subjects that go well with Chemistry include Physics, Mathematics and Human Biology. Students can study a range of other subjects depending upon what career or higher education course that they wish to do in the future.

Economics

Economics has become high profile. Oil prices, the credit crunch, bankers’ bonuses and fears of a Euro meltdown are just some of the topics rarely out of the news in recent years, throwing a light on the importance of, and divisions within, the discipline.

The course combines theory with its practical application to current issues. For example, should the railways be Government run, should the rich pay much higher taxes, is the UK better off leaving the European Union? Students should have a keen interest in current affairs and reasonable numerical skills.

 

Subjects covered

AS Subject Content
The basic economic problem e.g. infinite wants and scarce resources
Economics as a science
How prices are determined
Production, costs and revenue
Competitive and concentrated markets such as monopolies
Market failures where the price mechanism fails to allocate resources effectively
Measuring the performance of the UK economy
How the economy works: AD/AS analysis
Policies to manage the economy

Assessment Pattern
AS Level have 2 examinations, each of 1 hour 30 minutes duration.
Each exam carries 50% of the marks for the AS grade and comprises multiple choice, short answer and extended writing questions.

A level Subject content
All of the AS content plus:
Consumers and firms objectives in the economy
Competition between firms – perfect, monopoly, oligopoly
The labour market and how wages are determined
Poverty and inequality
Financial markets and monetary policy
Fiscal and Supply-side policies
The international economy

Assessment Pattern
A Level has 3 examinations, each of which is 2 hours in duration.
Each paper is worth 33% of the A Level and comprises context, extended writing and some multiple choice questions. There is no coursework.

Resources required 
AQA A-level Economics: Student Book 1
Authors: Steve Stoddard, Andrew Gillespie, David Horner and John Turner
Publisher: Collins
ISBN-13: 978-0-00-759760-4

and AQA A Level Economics for year 1 and AS
Ray Powell and James Powell
Publisher: Hodder Education
ISBN: 978-1-4718-2978-9

English Language and Literature

This course aims to increase awareness of the ways in which writers and speakers vary their use of language depending on their audience and purpose. It offers opportunities to develop your skills in communicating clearly and effectively in speech and writing.

The literature section of the course will introduce you to a range of novels, plays and poetry.

The study of English Language and Literature will appeal to all those who love reading, and who want to sharpen their skills in the written and spoken word.

 

Subjects covered

AS Paper 1: Views and Voices
You will learn how language choices help to shape the representations of different worlds and perspectives in literary fiction. You will apply your knowledge to the following:

• Prose fiction that constructs imaginary worlds
• Poetry that constructs a strong sense of personal perspective.

AS Paper 2: People and Places
You will learn about the ways in which writers and speakers present narratives about places, beginning with a general focus on broad questions such as:

• Why do people tell stories about places?
• How do writers and speakers present places, societies, people and events?

AS Assessment Pattern
Two Exam papers of 1½ hours each

A Level Paper 1: Telling Stories
You will learn about the ways in which writers and speakers present stories, beginning with a general focus on broad questions such as:

• Why do people tell stories?
• What ingredients do stories need to have?
• What makes a good story?
• How are stories told in different modes?
• Is there a special kind of story called ‘literature’?

A Level Paper 2: Exploring Conflict
You will study the AQA Anthology: Paris. The anthology includes a wide range of text types with a particular emphasis on non-fiction and non-literary material. In this part of the subject content, students explore speech and other genres.

A Level: Non Exam Assessment (NEA): Making Connections 
This part of the course requires you to make connections between a literary text and some non-literary material.

A Level Assessment Pattern
Paper 1: 3 hours examination
Paper 2: 2 ½ hours examination
NEA: Personal investigation of 2,500 – 3,000 words.

 

Careers

English can be an enjoyable subject to study for pleasure. However, it could also be a useful asset for any university or career choice you make. The skills you will learn on the course will enhance all aspects of your communication and equip you with excellent evaluative and analytical skills.

Film Studies

Film Studies A Level has been designed to ignite a passion for film and encourage broader cultural and historical perspectives on this academic area of study. This course of study encourages learners to watch, engage critically with and explore a wide range of film; to develop and sustain confident, personal responses to film via textual analysis; and to enjoy a variety of critically acclaimed films across the major genres. These include films from different cultural perspectives and from the 1930s to present day.

If you have an interest in film as a creative form, you will deepen your knowledge and understanding of this subject area, as well as enhancing your analysis, research and communication skills. The complex texts of film provide opportunities for sophisticated discussion and interpretation. Film Studies sits well alongside the subjects of Media Studies, English and Sociology, as well as supplying a valuable rich broadening of study for students in diverse other subjects.

 

Subjects covered

Year One: AS Level
AS Unit 1: Elements of Film
You will develop knowledge of film form through the study of US films from 1930-1960 and 1961-1990.

AS Unit 2: Understanding British Film
You will study one British film and demonstrate knowledge, understanding and skill through the production of either an extract from a contemporary British film or an extract from a screenplay for a contemporary British film, and an evaluation of the production.

Unit 1: Elements of Film. 2 hour paper, 70% of total AS Level
Unit 2: Understanding British Film. Coursework, 30% of total AS Level

Year Two: A Level
A Level Unit 1: Film History
You will develop knowledge of film form through the study of US films from the Silent Era, 1930-1960 and 1961-1990. You will also study films from two major European film movements or stylistic developments (e.g. French New Wave)

A Level Unit 2: Critical Approaches to Film
You will develop knowledge and understanding of key critical approaches to film and of narrative, genre, representations and spectatorship. You will study films from a range of categories, including Contemporary British, Documentary, US Independent and Non-European Non-English Language.

A Level Unit 3: Making Short Film
You will study a compilation of short British fiction films and a compilation of short British experimental films. You will demonstrate your knowledge, understanding and skills through the production of a 5 minute short film or a 10 minute screen play for a short film, and an evaluation of the production.

Unit 1: Film History. 2 hour paper, 35% of total A Level
Unit 2: Critical Approaches to Film. 2 hour paper, 35% of total A Level
Unit 3: Making Short Film. Coursework, 30% of total A Level.

Resources required
(Cameras and editing facilities are supplied for use within the course)

 

On completion

What skills will I learn?
Film Studies develops skills in analysis of audio-visual material, applying film studies critical practices. Written and oral presentation skills are developed, in communication complex material clearly with independent insight. Technical skills in film planning, production and post-production are developed, along with reflective practice in evaluating work against intentions and professional practice. Students are encouraged to develop their independent research and analysis skills within a structured environment.

Geography

This subject will appeal to anyone who is interested in the world around them. Every day in the media, we hear news stories about the effects of climate change, whether there are too many people on the earth and events such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. These issues and other exciting topics are at the heart of this subject. A very wide range of resources are used to help students’ understanding of the topics covered such as films, internet video clips, photographs, maps, animations and news articles. Field trips are an essential component of most options and are undertaken within a day.

 

Subjects covered

AS Subject Content
Topic 1: Tectonic processes and hazards
Topic 2: Landscape systems, processes and change – Coastal landscapes
Topic 3: Globalisation
Topic 4: Shaping Places - Regeneration

A Level Subject Content
Topic 5: The water cycle and water insecurity
Topic 6: The carbon cycle and energy security
Topic 7: Superpowers
Topic 8: Global development and connections – Migration, Identity and Sovereignty

Independent Investigation
The student defines a question or issue for investigation. The topic may relate to any aspect of geography contained within the specification
The student’s investigation will incorporate fieldwork data (collected individually or as part of a group) and own research and/or secondary data.

Assessment pattern:

Paper 1 
Content overview
● Topic 1: Tectonic Processes and Hazards
● Topic 2: Landscape Systems, Processes and Change – Coastal Landscapes and Change
● Area of study 3, Topic 5: The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity
● Area of study 3, Topic 6: The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

Paper 2 
Content overview
● Topic 3: Globalisation
● Topic 4: Shaping Places – Regenerating Places
● Topic 7: Superpowers
● Topic 8: Global Development and Connections – Migration, Identity and Sovereignty

Paper 3
Content overview
The specification contains three synoptic themes within the compulsory content areas:
● Players
● Attitudes and actions
● Futures and uncertainties.

Coursework: Independent Investigation 20% of the qualification
Content overview
● The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated.
● The student will produce a written report of 3000–4000 words.

Resources required
AS & A2 Textbook: Edexcel AS/A level Geography ISBN 978 1 292 13960 9
Includes an e-book.
Both published by Pearson Education Limited.

 

On completion

Why should I choose this course?
Having an A Level in Geography is highly valued by universities, potential employers and it also enhances all the travel experiences you may undertake in the future. The course links very well with a number of other subjects, such as Biology and Business Studies. Geography is classified as a science A Level by Russell group universities and therefore naturally fits with other science subjects. However, since there is human geography featured as well, it can successfully accompany Sociology. The subject matter is stimulating and invites you to ask more questions about the world. Students who have studied this subject have had a range of exciting fieldwork trips to the Hampshire Coast, New Forest, East London and local locations such as Yateley Country Park.

Government and Politics

We don't always like politicians and the things that government do but the business of politics touches every aspect of our lives. And while we criticize governments for some of their policies, it is better than having no governments at all. Society just wouldn’t function without the elected body to decide, say, what taxes will be levied, how these taxes will be spent on things like health and education or how the country will be defended.

Knowledge is power. And this popular A Level gives you the knowledge to understand how governments work particularly in the UK.

Why should I take this course?
Government and Politics is the right subject for you if:
• You have an interest in the world around you; you want to know more about the society in which you live, how it works and how it could work
• You enjoy debates, discussions and are comfortable with the idea that in politics there is no right or wrong
• You like thinking for yourself and want to develop your own views rather than accept the views of others

 

Subjects covered

Subject Content
Unit 1: UK Politics
In this unit you will discover how people in the UK are linked to politics, through the themes of democracy and political participation, electoral systems and voting behaviours, and party politics.

Unit 2: UK Government
This unit focuses on the main institutions of the UK government such as Parliament, the Prime Minster and Cabinet.

Unit 3: Comparative politics
This unit considers the US Constitution and federalism, US congress, US presidency, US Supreme Court, democracy and participation, civil rights.

Assessment Pattern
Unit 1: UK Politics 2 hour exam 
Section A: Political Participation One 30-mark questions from a choice of two (each question is based on a quote) – students must complete one of these.
Plus one 30-mark question from a choice of two – students must complete one of these
Section B: Core Political Ideas One 24-mark question from a choice of two

Unit 2: UK Government 2 hour exam 
Section A: UK Government One 30-mark questions from a choice of two (each question is based on a quote) – students must complete one of these. Plus one 30-mark question from a choice of two – students must complete one of these. Section B: Optional Political Ideas One 24-mark question from a choice of two.

Unit 3: Comparative politics 2 hour exam
Section A: One 12-mark question from a choice of two.
Section B: One compulsory 12-mark question based on a source.
Section C: Two 30-mark questions from a choice of three.

Resources required
Students will need to purchase a textbook.

History

History isn’t a subject that’s stuck in the past; far from it. Historical events have shaped society worldwide into what it is today.

The A Level History course has been designed to help you understand the value and significance of world events in the past. In the process you’ll gain a deeper understanding social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity. Knowing how people lived in the past helps to understand why people act as they do today.

 Subjects covered

AS Level Subject Content
Component 1: Breadth Study: Tsarist and Communist Russia, 1855-1964. You will discuss change, continuity, cause and consequence through this dramatic period of social and political change in Russia. In your first year you will study autocracy, reform and revolution in Russia, 1855-1917.
Assessment: Written exam 1 hour 30 minutes

Component 2: Depth Study: The English Revolution, 1625-1660. You will study in depth of the challenges faced by those in authority in the years before, during and after the English Civil War. This study explores concepts such as Divine Right; arbitrary government, Arminianism, and political and religious radicalism. It also encourages an in-depth understanding of arbitrary government and consensus, authority and opposition and issues of settlement. In your first year you will study the origins of the English Civil War, 1625-1642.
Assessment: Written exam 1 hour 30 minutes

A Level Subject content
Component 1: Breadth Study: Tsarist and Communist Russia, 1855-1964. You will discuss change, continuity, cause and consequence through this dramatic period of social and political change in Russia. In your second year you will study the Soviet Union, 1917-1964. Your final exam will cover what you learned over the two year period of study.
Assessment: Written exam 2 hours 30 minutes

Component 2: Depth Study: The English Revolution, 1625-1660. You will study in depth of the challenges faced by those in authority in the years before, during and after the English Civil War. This study explores concepts such as Divine Right; arbitrary government, Arminianism, and political and religious radicalism. It also encourages an in-depth understanding of arbitrary government and consensus, authority and opposition and issues of settlement. In your first year you will study radicalism, republic and restoration, 1642-1660. Your final exam will cover what you learned over the two year period of study.
Assessment: Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes 

Component 3: Historical investigation
A personal study of 3,000 – 3,500 words based on a topic of student's choice within the broad theme of social change in the twentieth century. It will draw upon the skills you have developed in investigating and interpreting primary and secondary sources. Teacher guidance will be provided.

Resources required
Students will need to purchase a textbooks for both AS and A Level.

Law

This course gives students the opportunity to study aspects of the English legal system and criminal law. It is a highly regarded qualification by both employers and Higher Education providers.

A Level Law provides a firm foundation for anyone who wishes to pursue a legal career. However, successful students are not limited to a career in law. Many careers require some legal knowledge. Consequently, it is widely regarded as a valuable qualification.

Why should I choose this course?
You should choose this course if you have an interest in law, good written communication and analytical skills and enjoy intellectual challenge.

Subjects covered

Subject Content (This is based on the exam board’s draft specification and may be subject to change)
Unit 1 – English legal system, nature of law and criminal law
Unit 2 – English legal system, nature of law and tort law
Unit 3 – English legal system, nature of law and contract law

Nature of law
All units require knowledge of the nature of law. This includes the difference between legal rules and other rules, civil law and criminal law and different types of law. It also involves an examination of the role law plays in society and the meaning of fault in civil liability. Students will examine Parliamentary law making including a consideration of influences on Parliament, the interpretation of statutes and case law. They will see how the laws are made and by whom and the relative advantages and disadvantages of each.

English legal system
Students will look at the English legal system which can be assessed in each of the Units. This will include the structure of the courts, the role of barristers, solicitors, legal executives, judges, magistrates and jurors. They will also learn of the alternatives to court proceedings.

Criminal law
This topic is specific to unit 1. Students will learn the basic rules, concepts and theories applicable to criminal law. In particular the course covers the law relating to fatal and non-fatal offences against the person, theft, robbery and attempts. In addition the defences of insanity, automatism, intoxication, self- defence and duress.

Tort law
This topic is specific to unit 2. Students will learn the basic rules, concepts and theories applicable to tort law. In particular the course covers tortious liability for negligence, including negligently inflicted psychiatric harm and economic loss, occupiers liability, vicarious liability, nuisance and liability arising under the doctrine of Rylands v Fletcher. Students will also examine defences and remedies applicable to tort law.

Contract law
This topic is specific to unit 3. Students will learn the basic rules, concepts and theories applicable to contract law. In particular the course covers the essential elements of a contract, terms and exclusion clauses, factors that may give rise to having a contract set aside, termination of a contract and remedies.

Assessment Pattern:
Unit 1 – one 2 hour exam Counts as 33% of the A level
Unit 2 – one 2 hour exam Counts as 33% of the A level
Unit 3 – one 2 hour exam Counts as 33% of the A level

Resources required
Tbc – as this will be a new specification the recommended book is not available yet.

Mathematics

New AS and A levels in Mathematics and Further Mathematics are being introduced in England for first teaching from September 2017. Students will need at least a grade 5 in the higher tier GCSE and additionally must have good algebraic skills in order to have some chance of coping with the course.

The course emphasises problem solving, reasoning and modeling, and a requirement for the use of technology.

All assessment will take place at the end of the course. Exam questions may draw on the content of the whole A level.
The content is fixed and will include pure mathematics, mechanics and statistics (including analysis of large data sets).

Why should I choose this course?
Maths is a highly regarded A Level and is useful for many careers.

Subjects covered

AS Subject Content
This AS level qualification builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding set out in the GCSE (9–1) subject content for mathematics for first teaching from 2015.
AS Level Mathematics B (MEI) is a linear qualification, with no options. The content is listed below, under four areas.

1. Mathematical processes consisting of mathematical argument and language, problem solving and mathematical modelling
2. Pure mathematics includes proof, algebra, graphs, an introduction to binomial expansions, trigonometry, logarithms, calculus and vectors
3. Mechanics includes kinematics in 1 dimension, working with forces and Newton’s laws
4. Statistics includes working with data from a sample to make inferences about a population, simple probability calculations, using the binomial distribution as a model and statistical hypothesis testing

Assessment Pattern
There will be two examination papers, at the end of the AS course, to assess all the content.
• Pure Mathematics and Mechanics (01), a 1½ hour paper assessing mathematical processes, pure mathematics and mechanics
• Pure Mathematics and Statistics (02), a 1½ hour paper assessing mathematical processes, pure mathematics and statistics

A2 Subject Content
1. Mathematical processes consisting of mathematical argument and language, problem solving and mathematical modelling
2. Pure mathematics includes proof, algebra, graphs, sequences, trigonometry, logarithms, calculus and vectors
3. Mechanics includes kinematics, motion under gravity, working with forces including friction, Newton’s laws and simple moments
4. Statistics includes working with data from a sample to make inferences about a population, probability calculations, using binomial and Normal distributions as models and statistical hypothesis testing.

Assessment Pattern
There will be three examination papers, at the end of the course, to assess all the content:
• Pure Mathematics and Mechanics (01), a 2 hour paper assessing mathematical processes, pure mathematics and mechanics
• Pure Mathematics and Statistics (02), a 2 hour paper assessing mathematical processes, pure mathematics and statistics
• Pure Mathematics and Comprehension (03), a 2 hour paper assessing mathematical processes and pure mathematics.

Resources Required
MEI text books.

Media Studies

WJEC Media Studies specification is designed to allow students to develop their abilities to respond critically to the media. Students will explore a wide variety of media (drawn from audio-visual, print and on-line media forms). Students will draw on their existing experiences and apply concepts and theories of study informing the study of texts, industry and audience interaction with the media.

Subjects covered

AS Subject Content
MS1 – Media Representations and Responses – 50% of AS (25% of full A level).
Three compulsory questions across three sections, including one question on unseen audio-visual or print-based material.
• Texts
• Representations
• Audience responses
MS2 – Media Production Processes – 50% of AS (25% of full A level)
Three components: a pre-production; a production which develops from the pre-production; a report on the production process.

A2 Subject Content
MS3 – Media Investigation & Production - 50 % of A2 (25% of full A level)
Three components of linked work, developing on the knowledge and skills of AS.
• A written investigation into media text/s based on one or more of the key media concepts of genre, narrative and/or representation.
• A media production.
• An evaluation of how the production is informed by the investigative research.
MS4 – Text, Industry and Audience - 50 % of A2 (25% of full A level)
Three media industries are studied, each one via three main texts as case studies.

Three questions are answered, from three sections: Text, Industry and Audience. Each question must be answered for a different media industry.

What skills will I learn?
Media studies develops skills in deconstruction, and analysis of the media texts and (at A2) industry practices. In particular you will consider potential audience interactions and influences on the media. Written communication skills are developed, as you will interpret complex material to demonstrate application of your understanding. This subject encourages students to develop their independent research and analysis skills within a structured environment. Technical skills are developed in film planning, production (often involving mature team-working skills) and post-production. The production coursework also develops reflective practice in evaluating work against intentions and professional practice.

Assessment Pattern
AS Media Studies is assessed through two modules:
MS1 examination of 2½ hours.
MS2 coursework module in three parts.

A2 Media Studies is assessed through two modules:
MS3 coursework with three components
MS4 examination of 2½ hours.

Resources Required
8GB SD Card (must be ‘Class 1’; Blank DVDs; USB memory stick; Text book as specified at start of the course. (Cameras and editing facilities are supplied for use within the course).

On completion

What skills will I learn?
Media studies develops skills in deconstruction, and analysis of the media texts and (at A2) industry practices. In particular you will consider potential audience interactions and influences on the media. Written communication skills are developed, as you will interpret complex material to demonstrate application of your understanding. This subject encourages students to develop their independent research and analysis skills within a structured environment. Technical skills are developed in film planning, production (often involving mature team-working skills) and post-production.  The production coursework also develops reflective practice in evaluating work against intentions and professional practice.

Philosophy

This course will equip you with the skills you need to explore your own views about some of the very big questions about the world around us – What is truth? What is morally right and wrong? Is there a God? What is thought?

You will learn how to develop arguments which are logical and well-supported, as well as getting to grips with some of the greatest thinkers who ever lived.

Why should I choose this course?
If you enjoy really stretching your mind and concentrating in detail on complex arguments you will find Philosophy a rewarding and maybe even life-changing course. Philosophy students can apply their skills in many different areas of employment, from journalism and teaching to politics and law.

 

Subjects covered

AS Subject Content
Section A: Epistemology
Here you will study such diverse topics as perception and reality; the nature of knowledge and experience; reason and deduction and also consider what we might mean by the word ‘rational’

Section B: Moral philosophy
You will extend your learning by considering what great thinkers such as Aristotle and Kant argued about virtue, authority, evil, right and wrong, and morality.

A2 Subject Content 
Section A: Metaphysics of God
Here you will study some of the arguments that have been made historically about the existence of God, critically evaluate religious language and consider the concept of destiny.

Section B: Metaphysics of the mind
In this section you will study the concept of the mind, where the mind resides, and the problem of other minds. You will look at issues affecting human autonomy and choice and the challenges posed by natural selection and evolution.

Assessment Pattern:
AS Level has one examination of 3 hours worth 100% of AS.
A Level has two examinations of 3 hours worth 100% of A Level.

There is no coursework.

This is a linear course where all A Level exams are taken at the end of year two.

Photography

This course will bring together the practical skills you need to develop your creativity using both digital and film-based techniques along with detailed study of the history of photography and in-depth analysis of the work of some of the masters in this field.

You will cover a wide range of topics such as portraiture, landscape and experimental. There is lots of opportunity for students to develop their own interests in their choice of work.

Why should I choose this course?
The Photography A Level is highly regarded by Universities as it is an academic, research based, qualification rather than a simple ‘how to’ practical course. However, each student will also attain a high degree of competence in photographic skills, which may be put to use for general photography. Each student is required to enter the examinations and must be fully committed to the course. Past achievements of students taking this course have been to a very high standard.

Subjects covered

AS Subject Content
Portfolio, No Time Limit, 60% of AS Grade
You will research and develop your own portfolio of work. This will be marked by your lecturers and moderated by the exam board.

Externally set assignment, 10 hours supervised time, 40% of AS Grade.
You will respond to a brief set by the exam board.

Additional A Level Content 
Personal Investigation, 60% of A Level Grade
You will research and develop your own portfolio of work. This will be marked by your lecturers and moderated by the exam board.

Externally set assignment, 15 hours supervised time, 40% of AS Grade.
You will respond to a brief set by the exam board.

Resources Required
Any basic 35mm SLR analogue system, equipped with fully manual override settings. Students will also need to purchase film and photographic printing materials for their practical work. The cost of these is estimated at approximately £150 per year.

Physics

Physics is at the heart of everything we do. We use the basic ideas to explain almost every aspect of our world from the smallest parts of our bodies to the great clusters of galaxies. Physics is relevant to almost every human activity. Such is the importance of physics, both now and for the future, that we need more young people to study physics.

This course will enable you to understand how science works and its relevance beyond the classroom and laboratory. The course will show you how physics links to other sciences and how the subject underpins important technologies.

Subjects covered

AS Subject Content
The AS specification introduces new topics, as well as building on previous studies in physics.The first topic involves the study of the SI system of measurement, units, prefix and limitations of Physical measurement.

Topic 2 introduces the students to modern Physics where they will gain an awareness of the development of new ideas in physics and their application to a variety of specialism.  Particle physics introduces students to the fundamental properties and nature of matter, radiation and quantum behaviour.

Electricity will introduce the students to electric circuits, voltage and current definition and electromotive force and resistivity.

The students will also have the opportunity to learn about the principles and application of mechanics, materials and waves. Building upon the knowledge gained at GCSE these topics will help them develop understanding of force and energy. Materials are studied in terms of their bulk and strength and students learn about the characteristics, properties and application of waves.

The students will have the opportunities to conduct a certain number of practical work, enabling them to use their knowledge and understanding of Physics in planning, carrying out, analysing and evaluating their work.

This AS Physics stand-alone qualification will be assessed through two exams at the end of the year.

A level Subject Content
The first year of the A level Physics is exactly the same as the AS stand-alone-qualification. The second year will include such fascinating topics as circular and oscillatory motion, gravitation, electric and magnetic fields, capacitors and the generation and transmission of alternative current.

Besides those topics, the students will have a chance to study nuclear and atomic Physics and an optional topic involving the study and interpretation of the Universe. Students gain a greater insight into the behaviour of objects at great distance from the earth and discover ways in which information from these objects can be gathered.

A level Physics students will have the opportunity to carry on a minimum of 12 experiments over the two years.

Assessment Pattern
At the end of the two years, the students will take 3 exams covering all the topics studied, with some questions assessing the practical skills.

Resources Required
Students will be required to purchase a textbook for both AS and A Level.

Careers

A physics education equips a person to work in many different and interesting places. The career opportunities available are almost as vast as the subject itself due, in part, to the transferable skills gained whilst studying physics. Employers see a physics qualification as an indication of someone who will immediately be an asset to the organisation.  You could gain employment in the different fields of engineering or in industrial or government laboratories. Many students progress into Higher Education.

Students who take Physics are strongly advised to also take Mathematics. Other subjects that go well with Physics include Chemistry and Human Biology. Students can study a range of other subjects depending upon what career or Higher Education course that they wish to pursue.

Psychology

Psychology is the study of the human mind and human behaviour. We seek to understand and explain thoughts, emotions and behaviour by looking at different explanations or perspectives.

Psychology is an interesting and challenging subject. It is highly regarded by employers and universities as it focuses on an understanding of what makes us think, feel and behave. It is a dynamic subject advancing quickly within the scientific discipline.

Why choose this course?
Psychology will appeal to students who are interested in understanding human behaviour. It is the science of behaviour and experience and encompasses a wide range of topics and subject areas.

 

Subjects covered

AS Subject Content
1. Social influence
2. Memory
3. Attachment
4. Approaches in Psychology
5. Psychopathology
6. Research methods

Assessed through two 1.5 hour written exams; one on Introductory Topics in Psychology and one on Psychology in Context, both entailing short questions and essays. 

A Level Subject Content
Compulsory content:
1. Social influence
2. Memory
3. Attachment
4. Psychopathology
5. Approaches in Psychology
6. Biopsychology
7. Research methods
8. Issues and debates in psychology

Optional content
Option 1:
9.   Relationships
10. Gender
11. Cognition and development

Option 2:
12. Schizophrenia
13. Eating behaviour
14. Stress

Option 3:
15. Aggression
16. Forensic psychology
17. Addiction

Assessed through three, 2 hour written exams; each entailing short questions and essays.

Resources Required
Textbook to be advised on first day.

Sociology

Are you interested in people and their behaviour? If the answer is 'Yes', then Sociology could be the right course for you. Sociology is the study of society and of people in groups in society. Sociology asks lots of questions about the relationships between groups of people within society and explores issues of power, roles, labelling, crime and inequality. These structures and relationships are often complex and invisible to the naked eye but nevertheless exist and affect us.

Sociology is a recognized and highly regarded qualification by many employers and universities and gives a good foundation into many careers and HE course options.

Why choose this course?
Sociology will appeal to students who are interested in understanding the influence of social groups in human behaviour. It is, essentially, the study of society and, as this implies, it encompasses a very wide range of topics and subject areas.

Sociology A Level is a well respected, recognised academic qualification which serves as a perfect foundation for many professions that involve working with people and having an understanding of the relationship between society and human behaviour. Professions in the fields of nursing, psychology, teaching, journalism, law, police force as well as many Higher Education institutions recommend that students have studied Sociology.

Subjects covered

A Level Sociology Subject Content

Education with Theory and Methods
• Education (Year One)
• Methods in Context (Year One & Two)
• Theory and Methods (Year One & Two)

Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods
• Crime and Deviance (Year Two)
• Theory and Methods (Year One & Two)

Topics in Sociology
• Families & Households (Year One)
• Beliefs in Society (Year Two)

Resources Required
AQA A Level Sociology Book One including AS Level (2015) by Robb Webb, Hal Westergaard, Keith Trobe and Annie Townend

AQA A Level Sociology Book Two (2016) by Robb Webb, Hal Westergaard, Keith Trobe and Annie Townend

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Combined Courses

Combine A Levels with a Vocational Programme

It’s possible to combine the study of one or two A Level courses with one of the following BTEC qualifications at Level 3:

  • Aeronautical Engineering
  • Art and Design
  • Creative Media Production
  • Engineering
  • Fashion
  • Graphic Design
  • Health and Social Care
  • Music and Music Technology
  • Performing Arts
  • Photography
  • Sport and Exercise Sciences

If you would like to apply to an A Level and BTEC combination, please apply for your A Levels through this page and discuss the option of combining courses at your interview.

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Entry Requirements

You’ll need grade C/grade 4 in English Language and Mathematics plus at least 3 other GCSE subjects at A*-C/9-4. Some programmes have additional requirements:

Mathematics and Psychology
Grade C/grade 5 at GCSE in Mathematics

Biology, Chemistry and Physics
GCSE grade B/grade 6 in subject or grade BB/grade 66 in Core and Additional Science; plus grade C/grade 5 in Mathematics

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Student Success

We love to see our students reaching their goals and going on to greater things.

See for yourself what our students think about our A Level courses and Farnborough College of Technology.

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